Exploring on Foot

Wow, it’s been a while since I posted here! All my focus lately is on looking after the two littlies and searching for a house so even the idea of getting out on my bike has fallen by the wayside. Cycling is firmly off the table until the weather improves – icy roads are not for me and I need my MTB buddy back before I can go and explore the trails – and rarely have 10 minutes free even for a quick twirl of the hoop, let alone a short yoga or kettlebell session.

What I am managing to do more of though is walk. With DD wanting – no, needing – to get out and burn off some of her never-ending supply of energy and us otherwise cooped up in the teeny-tiny little gite we’re renting (see my other blog for the low down on all that) I am often on my feet, even if its just chaperoning her down the road in the hameau for a short ride on her bike or to watch while she whizzes round and round in the square. This is good because it means I’m regularly hitting or nearly hitting my 7,500 daily step target, to the extent that I’ve considered upping it to 10,000. Maybe I’ll do that once the weather improves.

We’ve also been making more of an effort to get out and go on something resembling a proper walk. Nothing too strenuous as having two small children in tow makes the chances of getting around a longer walk less likely – just exploring some small circuits on local trails.

Part of the appeal of this area is that every village seems to have it’s own network of waymarked walks. On arrival in the village there’s usually a board with map showing the available routes and giving information on their gradings (following the green, blue, red, black gradings common to ski runs and bike trails) and navigation information. The navigation system is new to us as we have no such system in place in the UK, but it’s very intuitive and makes following a route fairly simple and relatively safe (with map and compass packed alongside, of course.)

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There are also extensive trails, usually marked on maps, which I’m told are effective rights of way unless a landowner states otherwise. French neighbours have informed me that you can pretty much follow any track or trail unless it has been fenced off and marked as private. Cool! I’m still not totally relaxed about this approach as I’m so used to the very prescriptive attitude to rights of way in the UK but we have started to venture onto some local paths, making up our own walks, and I’m sure we’ll do more of that as time goes on.

So where have we been? Well, we’ve done a number of short walks worthy of mention, all between two or three miles, over easy terrain, so nice to do as a family.

First we walked from Rouvenac where we followed the Sentier de Plâtriers route, which sounds very romantic but actually translates as the Path of Plasterers! This took us up from the village towards the ruined moulin (mill) and into a quiet, open valley before bringing us back round the hill and down through fields and woodland towards the village. Beautiful. It had plenty of “features” to keep us interested.One of family “catchphrases” is that We Like a Feature Walk, and this one ticked our boxes.

More recently we went off to Nebias to walk the Sentier du Labyrinthe Vert. Strava conked out on me just two minutes into it so I don’t have a track for that one, unfortunately. It was a great walk though, really laden with features and in a quite extraordinary landscape, so we’ll definitely go back to do it again.

Next, I’ll write up each of the walks and share my GPS tracks. Until then, a bien tôt!

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